economics

April 28, 2010

Learning About U.S. Immigration With The New York Times

Filed under: Uncategorized — ktetaichinh @ 12:25 am
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By SARAH KAVANAGH AND KATHERINE SCHULTEN

Immigration ExplorerMatthew Bloch and Robert Gebeloff/The New York Times The Times’s interactive Immigration Explorer Map allows you to select a foreign-born group and trace how they settled across the United States.

In this post, we present five quick ways to teach about current issues in immigration as well as a list of nearly 40 immigration-related lesson plans, useful Topics pages and multimedia from The Times and rich resources from around the Web.

Teachers: Tell us how you teach immigration.


1. Arizona’s new law: Read (or listen to news) about Arizona’s controversial new immigration law. Investigate different perspectives on the new law here, here and here. You might also examine President Obama’s and Senator McCain’s opinions of the law.

Finally, tell us what you think about Arizona’s new legislation.

2. Immigration’s impact on public schools: Use these interactive graphics to examine the impact of immigration on diversity in America’s classrooms and study the growth in the number of English-language learners in American public schools.

Inspect the statistics in your own school district and consider different perspectives about how young immigrants should be taught in public schools. Read an article and watch a video about the case of a Virginia school that teaches English-language learners in separate classrooms from native English speaking students.

To explore the topic further, teachers can use this lesson with secondary students or this lesson for elementary students.

3. Who are today’s immigrants? Listen to the personal stories of immigrants in the United States who work white collar jobs and read about how immigrants today are evenly distributed across the economic spectrum. Analyze a chart that illustrates the relationship between immigration and economic growth and another that shows which cities have the highest percentage of immigrants working in white collar jobs. Compare what you have learned about immigrants in the United States today to stereotypes about immigrants to the United States.

Teachers may want to wrap up this examination of the lives of immigrants in the United States today using this lesson, which has students interview an immigrant in their community.

4. Immigration past and present: Surf the Times’s Immigration Explorer, read about who’s coming to America today, and examine charts and graphs that illustrate contemporary immigration statistics.

Record what you find using the Coming to America handout (PDF). Teachers can have students explore these resources further using the “Coming to America” lesson plan. They might also do activities in this lesson plan about the American Dream, or in this lesson in which students write letters from imaginary immigrants to relatives in their countries of origin.

5. Immigration and your community: Explore the Times series Remade in America, which examines immigration through seven different lenses: schools, workplaces, hospitals, politics, businesses, social services and the family.

Pick one of the lenses as a focus and examine the multimedia feature that accompany the article. Then use the Times’ Immigration Explorer to find immigration data about your own community and add information about your own community to your findings. Or, split students into seven groups to investigate immigration from all seven lenses.


Lessons on The Immigrant Experience

Lessons on Immigrant Rights and Immigration Law in the U.S.

Lessons on Immigration History

Lessons on Migration Around the World


Student Crossword Puzzles

Times Curriculum Specials


Related Times Topics

Selected Times Specials and Multimedia

For more related multimedia resources, visit the Multimedia/Photos page and search “immigration.”


Resources from Around the Web

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